Anthocyanins Function as Anti-Inflammatory Agents in a Drosophila Model for Adipose Tissue Macrophage Infiltration

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Abstract

Epidemiological and preclinical studies have demonstrated that bioactive foods like flavonoids, polyphenolic compounds derived from fruits and vegetables, exert a protective action against obesity, cardiovascular disorders, and Adipocyte Tissue Macrophage infiltration (ATM). All these pathologies are characterized by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and in proinflammatory cytokines that have been shown to favor the migration of immune cells, particularly of macrophages, in metabolically active organs like the liver and adipose tissue, that in Drosophila are constituted by a unique organ: the fat body. This study, using a unique Drosophila model that mimics human ATM, reveals the beneficial effects of flavonoids to reduce tissue inflammation. Our data show that anthocyanin-rich food reduces the number of hemocytes, Drosophila macrophages, infiltrating the fat cells, a process that is associated with reduced production of ROS and reduced activation of the JNK/SAPK p46 stress kinase, suggesting a fundamental function for anthocyanins as antioxidants in chronic inflammation and in metabolic diseases.

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Valenza, A., Bonfanti, C., Pasini, M. E., & Bellosta, P. (2018). Anthocyanins Function as Anti-Inflammatory Agents in a Drosophila Model for Adipose Tissue Macrophage Infiltration. BioMed Research International, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1155/2018/6413172

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