Aims and method

To study the use of antidepressants in adults with intellectual disability, focusing on medic..." />

Aims and method ..." />
Aims and method ..." />

Antidepressant use in adults with intellectual disability

  • Rai P
  • Kerr M
N/ACitations
Citations of this article
8Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

<div class="abstract" data-abstract-type="normal"> <div class='sec'> <span class="bold">Aims and method</span> <p>To study the use of antidepressants in adults with intellectual disability, focusing on medication type, indication, retention and clinical outcome. Case notes of all service users in a learning disability service were hand-searched to identify antidepressant usage, and those who had been treated with antidepressants and in whom at least 1 year of follow-up was possible were included in the study.</p> </div> <div class='sec'> <span class="bold">Results</span> <p>A total of 241 treatment episodes were identified. The rates of positive outcome in terms of clinical improvement at 6 weeks, 6 months and 12 months were 49.4%, 48.1% and 49% respectively, and only 29 (12%) episodes of side-effects had been noted.</p> </div> <div class='sec'> <span class="bold">Clinical implications</span> <p>Antidepressants are commonly prescribed in adults with intellectual disability. Approximately half did well in terms of clinical improvement.</p> </div> </div>

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Rai, P. R., & Kerr, M. (2010). Antidepressant use in adults with intellectual disability. The Psychiatrist, 34(4), 123–126. https://doi.org/10.1192/pb.bp.108.023325

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free