The antihypertensive efficacy of the novel calcium antagonist mibefradil in comparison with nifedipine GITS in moderate to severe hypertensives with ambulatory hypertension

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Abstract

Mibefradil is a novel calcium antagonist that blocks selectively the T-type calcium channels. In this double-blind forced titration study design we compared the effects of mibefradil 50, 100, and 150 mg and nifedipine GITS 30, 60, and 90 mg monotherapies or combined with lisinopril 20 mg in 71 moderate to severe hypertensives (59 men and 12 women) with confirmed ambulatory hypertension. An incremental dose-response effect was observed both in clinic and ambulatory blood pressure parameters during treatment with mibefradil and nifedipine GITS alone and combined with lisinopril. At maximal dosage, patients treated with mibefradil experienced a greater (P < .05) reduction in clinic and ambulatory diastolic blood pressures as well as a greater response rate (86% v 69%). Trough:peak ratios for systolic and diastolic blood pressures were > 90% at each dose level. Significant decrease in baseline heart rate was observed with mibefradil 150 mg alone or combined with lisinopril, but no patients experienced clinically significant atrioventricular conduction abnormalities. Adverse events related to vasodilation were more prevalent in the nifedipine GITS group. Consequently, the results of the present study demonstrate that the novel calcium channel blocker mibefradil, either alone or in combination with lisinopril, is effective in reducing clinic and 24-h blood pressures while decreasing heart rate and is well tolerated in patients with moderate to severe hypertension.

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Lacourcière, Y., Poirier, L., Lefebvre, J., Archambault, F., Dalle Ave, S., Ward, C., & Lindberg, E. (1997). The antihypertensive efficacy of the novel calcium antagonist mibefradil in comparison with nifedipine GITS in moderate to severe hypertensives with ambulatory hypertension. American Journal of Hypertension, 10(2), 189–196. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0895-7061(96)00322-6

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