Applying underground gas storage experience to geological carbon dioxide storage: A case study from Australia's Otway Basin

2Citations
Citations of this article
13Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Underground gas storage (UGS) facilities provide a wealth of information, which can be used to better understand various aspects of CO2 storage in depleted reservoirs. In some cases UGS facilities can provide important site specific information for carbon storage projects that are planned in similar formations in close proximity. In this paper, we discuss the various ways in which UGS facilities can be used to extract important information, and when possible we draw upon information from the Iona gas storage facility in Australia's Otway basin. The Iona facility is located 20 km away from the CO2CRC Otway Project, in which CO2 65445 tonnes of 77 mole% carbon dioxide, 20 mole% methane and 3 mole% other gas components (containing about 58000 tonnes of carbon dioxide) was injected into the Waarre C formation over a 17 month period. In this paper, we compare the factors that control CO2 seal capacity and discuss how UGS facilities can provide information on sustainable column heights either limited by faults or by cap rocks. We also present dynamic modeling results in which information is gained regarding injectivity, pressure evolution of the reservoir, storage capacity and maximum fluid pressures sustained by the faults. Understanding such parameters is important for the safe operation of any carbon storage project, be it on a demonstration or industrial scale. © 2011 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Tenthorey, E., Nguyen, D., & Vidal-Gilbert, S. (2011). Applying underground gas storage experience to geological carbon dioxide storage: A case study from Australia’s Otway Basin. In Energy Procedia (Vol. 4, pp. 5534–5540). Elsevier Ltd. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2011.02.540

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free