Assessment of background parenchymal enhancement and lesion kinetics in breast MRI of BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers compared to matched controls using quantitative kinetic analysis

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Abstract

Rationale and Objectives: To investigate whether quantitative kinetic analysis of lesions and background parenchyma in breast magnetic resonance imaging can elucidate differences between BRCA carriers and sporadic controls with high risk for breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Fifty-nine BRCA and 59 control cases (49 benign, 10 malignant) were examined in this study. Principal component analysis was applied for quantitative analysis of dynamic signal in background parenchyma (B) and lesion (L) in terms of initial enhancement ratio (IER) and delayed enhancement ratio (DER). Results: Control B-IER, B-DER, L-IER, and L-DER were higher than BRCA cases in all women and in women with benign lesions; statistically significant differences in B-IER and B-DER (all women: P = 0.02 and P = 0.02, respectively; benign only: P = 0.005 and P = 0.005, respectively). In the control cohort, B-IER and B-DER were higher in the premenopausal women than in the postmenopausal women (P = 0.013 and 0.003, respectively), but not in the BRCA cohort; this led to significant differences in B-IER and B-DER between the control and the BRCA groups in the premenopausal women (P = 0.01 and 0.01, respectively) but not in the postmenopausal women. Conclusion: Results suggest possible differences in the vascular properties of background parenchyma between BRCA carriers and noncarriers and its association with menopausal status.

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Lewin, A. A., Gene Kim, S., Babb, J. S., Melsaether, A. N., McKellop, J., Moccaldi, M., … Moy, L. (2016). Assessment of background parenchymal enhancement and lesion kinetics in breast MRI of BRCA 1/2 mutation carriers compared to matched controls using quantitative kinetic analysis. Academic Radiology, 23(3), 358–367. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2015.11.011

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