The Association between Four Genetic Variants in MicroRNAs (rs11614913, rs2910164, rs3746444, rs2292832) and Cancer Risk: Evidence from Published Studies

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Abstract

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) participate in diverse biological pathways and may act as either tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA may contribute to cancer development with changes in the microRNA's properties and/or maturation. Polymorphisms in miRNAs have been suggested in predisposition to cancer risk; however, accumulated studies have shown inconsistent conslusionss. To further validate determine whether there is any potential association between the four common SNPs (miR-196a2C>T, rs11614913; miR-146aG>C, rs2910164; miR-499A>G, rs3746444; miR-149C>T, rs2292832) and the risk for developing risk, a meta-analysis was performed according to the 40 published case-control studies. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the extent of the association. The results demonstrated that the rs11614913TT genotype was significantly associated with a decreased cancer risk, in particular with a decreased risk for colorectal cancer and lung cancer, or for Asian population subgroup. In addition, the rs2910164C allele was associated with decreased risk for esophageal cancer, cervical cancer, prostate cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), in particular in Asian population subgroup. Similarly, the rs3746444G allele was observed as a risk factor for cancers in the Asian population. It is concluded that two SNPs prsent in miRNAs(rs11614913TT, and rs2910164C) may protect against the pathogenesis of some cancers, and that the rs3746444 may increase risk for cancer. © 2012 He et al.

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He, B., Pan, Y., Cho, W. C., Xu, Y., Gu, L., Nie, Z., … Wang, S. (2012). The Association between Four Genetic Variants in MicroRNAs (rs11614913, rs2910164, rs3746444, rs2292832) and Cancer Risk: Evidence from Published Studies. PLoS ONE, 7(11). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0049032

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