Association between perceived urban built environment attributes and leisure-time physical activity among adults in Hangzhou, China

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Abstract

Background: Neighborhood built environment may influence residents' physical activity, which in turn, affects their health. This study aimed to determine the associations between perceived built environment and leisure-time physical activity in Hangzhou, China. Methods: 1440 participants aged 25-59 were randomly selected from 30 neighborhoods in three types of administrative planning units in Hangzhou. International Physical Activity Questionnaire long form and NEWS-A were used to obtain individual-level data. The China Urban Built Environment Scan Tool was used to objectively assess the neighborhood-level built environment. Multi-level regression was used to explore the relationship between perceived built environment variables and leisure-time physical activities. Data was collected in Hangzhou from June to December in 2012, and was analyzed in May 2013. Results: Significant difference between neighborhood random variations in physical activity was identified (P= 0.0134); neighborhood-level differences accounted for 3.0% of the variability in leisure-time physical activity. Male residents who perceived higher scores on access to physical activity destinations reported more involvement in leisure-time physical activity. Higher scores on perception of esthetic quality, and lower on residential density were associated with more time in leisure-time walking in women. Conclusions: The present study demonstrated that perceived urban built environment attributes significantly correlate with leisure-time physical activity in Hangzhou, China. © 2014.

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Su, M., Tan, Y. yun, Liu, Q. min, Ren, Y. jun, Kawachi, I., Li, L. ming, & Lv, J. (2014). Association between perceived urban built environment attributes and leisure-time physical activity among adults in Hangzhou, China. Preventive Medicine, 66, 60–64. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.06.001

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