Association of elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels with angiographic findings among patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

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Abstract

Objectives We hypothesized that elevated B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels would be associated with a greater severity of angiographic disease and a greater extent of myocardium at risk. Background Elevations of BNP have been associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes in patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI). Methods Of the 2,220 patients with UA/NSTEMI enrolled in the Treat Angina with Aggrastat and Determine Cost of Therapy with an Invasive or Conservative Strategy-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction-18 (TACTICS-TIMI-18) trial, 276 randomized to the invasive arm had both baseline BNP levels and angiographic core laboratory data. Patients were categorized according to their baseline BNP levels as ≤80 or >80 pg/ml. Results A total of 233 patients (84%) had BNP levels >80 pg/ml, and 43 (16%) had admission BNP levels >80 pg/ml. Patients with BNP >80 pg/ml had tighter culprit vessel stenosis on quantitative coronary angiography (median stenosis 76% vs. 67%, p = 0.004) and a higher (slower) corrected TIMI frame count (median CTFC 43 vs. 30, p = 0.018) in the culprit vessel. The median BNP level was higher in patients with a left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) versus non-LAD culprit lesion location (median BNP level 40 vs. 24 pg/ml, p = 0.005), and the culprit artery was more often the LAD in patients with BNP >80 pg/ml compared with ≤80 pg/ml (44% vs. 30%, p = 0.06). Conclusions Among patients with UA/NSTEMI, elevated BNP levels are associated with tighter culprit stenosis, higher CTFC, and LAD involvement. These findings suggest that elevated BNP may be associated with a greater severity and extent of myocardial ischemic territory during the index event and may partly explain the association between elevated BNP and adverse outcomes. © 2004 by the American College of Cardiology Foundation.

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Sadanandan, S., Cannon, C. P., Chekuri, K., Murphy, S. A., Dibattiste, P. M., Morrow, D. A., … Gibson, C. M. (2004). Association of elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels with angiographic findings among patients with unstable angina and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 44(3), 564–568. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2004.03.072

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