The Association of Endothelin-1 with Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Black South African Women: The SABPA Study

  • du Plooy C
  • Mels C
  • Huisman H
  • et al.
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Abstract

Background . Limited data exist regarding endothelin-1 (ET-1), a vasoactive contributor in vascular tone, in a population subjected to early vascular deterioration. We compared ET-1 levels and explored its association with markers of arterial stiffness in black and white South Africans. Methodology . This cross-sectional substudy included 195 black (men: n=99 ; women: n=95 ) and 197 white (men: n=99 ; women: n=98 ) South Africans. Serum ET-1 levels were measured as well as markers of arterial stiffness (blood pressure, pulse wave velocity, and arterial compliance). ET-1 levels were higher in black men and white women compared to their counterparts after adjusting for C-reactive protein. In both single and partial (adjusting for body mass index and gamma glutamyl transferase) regression analyses ET-1 correlated with age, interleukin-6, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, and pulse wave velocity in black women. In multivariate regression analyses the independent association of ET-1 with systolic blood pressure (Adj. R2=0.13 ; β=0.28 , p<0.01 ) and pulse pressure (Adj. R2=0.11 ; β=0.27 , p<0.01 ) was confirmed in black women only. ET-1 additionally associated with interleukin-6 in black women ( p<0.01 ). Conclusion . Our result suggests that ET-1 and its link with subclinical arteriosclerosis are potentially driven by low-grade inflammation as depicted by the association with interleukin-6 in the black female cohort.

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du Plooy, C. S., Mels, C. M. C., Huisman, H. W., & Kruger, R. (2015). The Association of Endothelin-1 with Markers of Arterial Stiffness in Black South African Women: The SABPA Study. Journal of Amino Acids, 2015, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/481517

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