U.S. Atlantic coastal fisheries - How effective have management plans been in maintaining 'Sustainable fisheries'?

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Abstract

Coastal and residential development along the Atlantic coast of the United States is expected to increase by about 73% between 1980 and 2000. Present estimates indicate that over 59% of the population of the United States lives within 50 miles of the coast. This increase in coastal population coupled with increased demands for fishery products and increased efficiency in catching fish has severely stressed many Atlantic coast fisheries. Fisheries have been affected by increased pollution, habitat loss and overfishing. In 1976, the Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act was passed creating Fishery Management Councils with the goal of imposing strict conservation measures in the U.S. Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). This paper discusses potential causes of Atlantic Coast fisheries declines and gives examples of specific fishery plans that have been developed to manage U.S. fisheries.

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Hoss, D. E., Bath, G. E., Cross, F. A., & Merriner, J. V. (1999). U.S. Atlantic coastal fisheries - How effective have management plans been in maintaining “Sustainable fisheries”? Limnologica, 29(3), 227–232. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0075-9511(99)80006-1

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