Atmospheric CO 2 source and sink patterns over the Indian region

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Abstract

<p><strong>Abstract.</strong> In this paper we examine CO<sub>2</sub> emission hot spots and sink regions over India as identified from global model simulations during the period 2000–2009. CO<sub>2</sub> emission hot spots overlap with locations of densely clustered thermal power plants, coal mines and other industrial and urban centres; CO<sub>2</sub> sink regions coincide with the locations of dense forest. Fossil fuel CO<sub>2</sub> emissions are compared with two bottom-up inventories: the Regional Emission inventories in ASia (REAS v1.11; 2000–2009) and the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR v4.2) (2000–2009). Estimated fossil fuel emissions over the hot spot region are ∼ <span class="thinspace"></span>500–950<span class="thinspace"></span>gC<span class="thinspace"></span>m<sup>−2</sup><span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> as obtained from the global model simulation, EDGAR v4.2 and REAS v1.11 emission inventory. Simulated total fluxes show increasing trends, from 1.39<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>1.01<span class="thinspace"></span>%<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> (19.8<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>1.9<span class="thinspace"></span>TgC<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup>) to 6.7<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>0.54<span class="thinspace"></span>%<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> (97<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>12<span class="thinspace"></span>TgC<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup>) over the hot spot regions and decreasing trends of −0.95<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>1.51<span class="thinspace"></span>%<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> (−1<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>2<span class="thinspace"></span>TgC<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup>) to −5.7<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>2.89<span class="thinspace"></span>%<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> (−2.3<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>2<span class="thinspace"></span>TgC<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup>) over the sink regions. Model-simulated terrestrial ecosystem fluxes show decreasing trends (increasing CO<sub>2</sub> uptake) over the sink regions. Decreasing trends in terrestrial ecosystem fluxes imply that forest cover is increasing, which is consistent with India State of Forest Report (2009). Fossil fuel emissions show statistically significant increasing trends in all the data sets considered in this study. Estimated trend in simulated total fluxes over the Indian region is ∼ <span class="thinspace"></span>4.72<span class="thinspace"></span>±<span class="thinspace"></span>2.25<span class="thinspace"></span>%<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> (25.6<span class="thinspace"></span>TgC<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup>) which is slightly higher than global growth rate ∼ <span class="thinspace"></span>3.1<span class="thinspace"></span>%<span class="thinspace"></span>yr<sup>−1</sup> during 2000–2010.</p>

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APA

Fadnavis, S., Ravi Kumar, K., Tiwari, Y. K., & Pozzoli, L. (2016). Atmospheric CO 2 source and sink patterns over the Indian region. Annales Geophysicae, 34(2), 279–291. https://doi.org/10.5194/angeo-34-279-2016

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