Uptake of intermittent preventive therapy among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in public and registered private health facilities in Oyo State, Nigeria

  • Akpasa A
  • Adebayo A
  • Onyilo J
  • et al.
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Abstract

Background: Malaria infection during pregnancy remain a major public health problem in Nigeria. The 2013 Nigeria Demography and Health Survey revealed that while most pregnant women (PW) access Antenatal Care (ANC) from skilled care providers, majority of them do not benefit from interventions to prevent malaria. Intermittent Preventive Therapy (IPTp) using Sulphadoxine-Pyrimethamine (SP) is a full therapeutic course of intermittent medicine given to PW at routine ANC visits. The WHO recommends that this treatment be given to all PW at each scheduled antenatal care visit except during the first trimester. In Nigeria, the national guidelines and strategies for malaria prevention and control during pregnancy has been revised to reflect WHO recommendations.<br /><br />Methods & Materials: This study utilized secondary data from the routine national District Health Information System which houses the health management information system to assess IPTp uptake among PW who attended ANC in public and private health facilities (HFs) in Oyo State Nigeria from October 2014 to September 2015. The national data system is able to report only two doses. Descriptive statistics was performed to assess IPTp uptake from reporting HFs within the period.<br /><br />Results: A total of 122,320 pregnant women attended antenatal clinics in 1139 public and private HFs; reporting rate was 93.3% for all health facilities; 99% for public and 84% for private during the period. Overall, 54% (75.1% public, 28.4% private) of first ANC attendees received IPTp1; while only 20% (75.5% public, 24.9% private) received IPTp2. Sixty-four percent attended ANC for a minimum of four times; 53% of all PW who attended ANC were delivered in the HFs (48.8% public and 51.2% private).<br /><br />Conclusion: Although majority of the PW had attended ANC at least four times, uptake of the two doses of IPTp remains low; this was much worse in the private HFs. Targeted capacity building for ANC providers and HFs in the private sector may reduce missed opportunities for prevention of malaria among women attending ANC in the state. Further exploration of kind of care received by those who attended ANC but did not deliver in the HF is recommended.

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APA

Akpasa, A. O., Adebayo, A., Onyilo, J., Ahmed, B., Ladipo, T. O., Oke, Y., … Aiyenigba, B. (2016). Uptake of intermittent preventive therapy among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in public and registered private health facilities in Oyo State, Nigeria. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 45, 272–273. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2016.02.605

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