P3-281: Enhancing person-centered care by comparing cognitive functioning in long-term and short-stay nursing home residents

  • Mace R
  • Clark K
  • Mansbach W
  • et al.
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Abstract

Background: In the US, the Affordable Care Act of 2010 mandated a transition to person-centered care for long-term care facilities. Yet, it can be difficult to determine choice preferences, needs, and values for cognitively impaired individuals if they are unable to clearly communicate them to facility providers. The high base rate of dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) in nursing homes is well documented on a general basis; however, our understanding of the unique prevalence of cognitive levels in long-term care and short stay residents is limited. Our aims are to investigate the rates of cognitive impairment in long-term and short stay nursing home residents and determine if there are significant differences in specific cognitive levels between these two groups. Methods: Five hundred seventy-nine long-term and short stay residents were randomly selected from 18 Maryland skilled nursing facilities. Three hundred forty-five met inclusion criteria for participation (mean age 79.41 � 10.79) and completed a cognitive evaluation tool (Brief Cognitive Assessment Tool; BCAT). Results: Based on BCAT scores, 78.9% of the long-term residents had dementia compared to 61.4% for short stay residents. A Pearson's chi-square test for independence indicated the proportions of MCI, mild, and moderate to severe dementia were significantly different between the long-term and short stay nursing home residents (p = .00). The odds of being moderately to severely demented was 2.76 times greater for nursing home residents who were long-term care compared to short stay. A one-way multivariate analysis of variance indicated that BCAT Total scores and BCAT Factor scores were significantly different at the between long-term and short stay nursing home residents (p < .001 for all tests). Conclusions: We discuss implications of these empirical findings in terms of facilitating person-centered care in nursing homes.

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APA

Mace, R. A., Clark, K. M., Mansbach, W. E., & Firth, I. E. (2015). P3-281: Enhancing person-centered care by comparing cognitive functioning in long-term and short-stay nursing home residents. Alzheimer’s & Dementia, 11(7S_Part_16), P740–P740. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2015.06.1654

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