Employer reviews may say as much about the employee as they do the employer: online disclosures, organizational attachments, and unethical behavior

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Abstract

Do reviews on organizational review websites (e.g., Indeed.com, GlassDoor.com) speak to the employer or the employee? This study tests the structural relationship between cognitive and affective organizational attachments and three outcomes: willingness to disclose one’s workplace online, unethical pro-organizational behavior (UPB), and workplace reviews. Using a national sample of U.S. workers (N = 304), we examine how organizational identification and commitment relate to publicly posting about one’s organization. Self-presentation and organizational attachment are used to hypothesize how individuals selectively self-present organizational identities online. Structural equation modeling shows identification and commitment both positively relate to review ratings. While identification positively predicts online disclosure and UPB, commitment is unrelated to disclosure and has a buffering effect whereby it negatively predicts UPB and interacts with UPB to predict organizational review ratings. Findings illustrate that online reviews and disclosures of one's workplace may say as much about the worker as the workplace itself.

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APA

Piercy, C. W., & Carr, C. T. (2020). Employer reviews may say as much about the employee as they do the employer: online disclosures, organizational attachments, and unethical behavior. Journal of Applied Communication Research, 48(5), 577–597. https://doi.org/10.1080/00909882.2020.1812692

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