The level of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein is elevated in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea

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Abstract

Background: lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) has been to be a surrogate marker of inflammation in OSA. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the concentration of LBP is elevated in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: A total of 90 patients were enrolled into the study, 50 subjects were divided into OSA groups and 40 in healthy control according to PSG examination. Subsequently, patients with apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≧ 5, were divided into different subgroups according to blood pressure, gender, body mass index (BMI) and AHI. Venous blood samples were collected for detection after polysomnography. The serum levels of LBP and proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α) were tested by ELISA. Results: The present study demonstrated that the serum levels of both LBP and proinflammatory cytokines were elevated in OSA patients. A stratified analysis conducted to analyze differences among subgroups indicated that OSA patients with a higher AHI or BMI had an increased level of LBP and proinflammatory cytokines (all p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant correlations were observed between LBP and inflammation and AHI. Multivariate regression analysis also demonstrated that AHI, LSaO2 and BMI had impact on the concentration of LBP. Conclusion: The research showed that the serum level of LBP and proinflammatory cytokines were elevated in adult patients with OSA, and an association with severity of disease and BMI were established. Furthermore, sleep apnea and BMI had effect on the concentration of LBP.

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Kong, Y., Li, Z., Tang, T., Wu, H., Liu, J., Gu, L., … Huang, Q. (2018). The level of lipopolysaccharide-binding protein is elevated in adult patients with obstructive sleep apnea. BMC Pulmonary Medicine, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12890-018-0647-z

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