The Linked-Convergent Distinction

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Abstract

The linked-convergent distinction introduced by Stephen Thomas in 1977 is primarily a distinction between ways in which two or more reasons can directly support a claim, and only derivatively a distinction between types of structures, arguments, reasoning, reasons, or premisses. As with the deductive-inductive distinction, there may be no fact of the matter as to whether a given multi-premiss argument is linked or convergent.

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APA

Hitchcock, D. (2017). The Linked-Convergent Distinction. In Argumentation Library (Vol. 30, pp. 21–29). Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-53562-3_2

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