A Bacteria-Based Self-Healing Cementitious Composite for Application in Low-Temperature Marine Environments

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Abstract

The current paper presents a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments. The composite was tested for its crack-healing capacity through crack water permeability measurements, and strength development through compression testing. The composite displayed an excellent crack-healing capacity, reducing the permeability of cracks 0.4 mm wide by 95%, and cracks 0.6 mm wide by 93% following 56 days of submersion in artificial seawater at 8 °C. Healing of the cracks was attributed to autogenous precipitation, autonomous bead swelling, magnesium-based mineral precipitation, and bacteria-induced calcium-based mineral precipitation in and on the surface of the bacteria-based beads. Mortar specimens incorporated with beads did, however, exhibit lower compressive strengths than plain mortar specimens. This study is the first to present a bacteria-based self-healing cementitious composite for application in low-temperature marine environments, while the formation of a bacteria-actuated organic–inorganic composite healing material represents an exciting avenue for self-healing concrete research.

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APA

(2017). A Bacteria-Based Self-Healing Cementitious Composite for Application in Low-Temperature Marine Environments. Biomimetics, 2(4), 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/biomimetics2030013

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