Bacterial c-di-GMP affects hematopoietic Stem/progenitors and their niches through STING

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Abstract

Upon systemic bacterial infection, hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) migrate to the periphery in order to supply a sufficient number of immune cells. Although pathogen-associated molecular patterns reportedly mediate HSPC activation, how HSPCs detect pathogen invasion invivo remains elusive. Bacteria use the second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) for a variety of activities. Here, we report that c-di-GMP comprehensively regulated both HSPCs and their niche cells through an innate immune sensor, STING, thereby inducing entry into the cell cycle and mobilization of HSPCs while decreasing the number and repopulation capacity of long-term hematopoietic stem cells. Furthermore, we show that type I interferon acted as a downstream target of c-di-GMP to inhibit HSPC expansion in the spleen, while transforming growth factor-β was required for c-di-GMP-dependent splenic HSPC expansion. Our results define machinery underlying the dynamic regulation of HSPCs and their niches during bacterial infection through c-di-GMP/STING signaling.

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APA

Kobayashi, H., Kobayashi, C. I., Nakamura-Ishizu, A., Karigane, D., Haeno, H., Yamamoto, K. N., … Takubo, K. (2015). Bacterial c-di-GMP affects hematopoietic Stem/progenitors and their niches through STING. Cell Reports, 11(1), 71–84. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2015.02.066

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