Bacterial Metabolite Indole Modulates Incretin Secretion from Intestinal Enteroendocrine L Cells

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Abstract

It has long been speculated that metabolites, produced by gut microbiota, influence host metabolism in health and diseases. Here, we reveal that indole, ametabolite produced from the dissimilation of tryptophan, is able to modulate the secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) from immortalized and primary mouse colonic L cells. Indole increased GLP-1 release during short exposures, but it reduced secretion over longer periods. These effects were attributed to the ability of indole to affect two key molecular mechanisms in L cells. On the one hand, indole inhibited voltage-gated K+ channels, increased the temporal width of action potentials fired by L cells, and led to enhanced Ca2+ entry, thereby acutely stimulating GLP-1 secretion. On the other hand, indole slowed ATP production by blocking NADH dehydrogenase, thus leading to a prolonged reduction of GLP-1 secretion. Our results identify indole as a signaling molecule by which gut microbiota communicate with L cells and influence host metabolism.

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APA

Chimerel, C., Emery, E., Summers, D. K., Keyser, U., Gribble, F. M., & Reimann, F. (2014). Bacterial Metabolite Indole Modulates Incretin Secretion from Intestinal Enteroendocrine L Cells. Cell Reports, 9(4), 1202–1208. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.10.032

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