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Tumor genomic profiling guides patients with metastatic gastric cancer to targeted treatment: The viktory umbrella trial

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Abstract

The VIKTORY (targeted agent eValuation In gastric cancer basket KORea) trial was designed to classify patients with metastatic gastric cancer based on clinical sequencing and focused on eight different biomarker groups (RAS aberration, TP53 mutation, PIK3CA mutation/amplification, MET amplification, MET overexpression, all negative, TSC2 deficient, or RIC-TOR amplification) to assign patients to one of the 10 associated clinical trials in second-line (2L) treatment. Capivasertib (AKT inhibitor), savolitinib (MET inhibitor), selumetinib (MEK inhibitor), ada-vosertib (WEE1 inhibitor), and vistusertib (TORC inhibitor) were tested with or without chemotherapy. Seven hundred seventy-two patients with gastric cancer were enrolled, and sequencing was successfully achieved in 715 patients (92.6%). When molecular screening was linked to seamless immediate access to parallel matched trials, 14.7% of patients received biomarker-assigned drug treatment. The biomarker-assigned treatment cohort had encouraging response rates and survival when compared with conventional 2L chemotherapy. Circulating tumor (ctDNA) analysis demonstrated good correlation between high MET copy number by ctDNA and response to savolitinib. SIGNIFICANCE: Prospective clinical sequencing revealed that baseline heterogeneity between tumor samples from different patients affected response to biomarker-selected therapies. VIKTORY is the first and largest platform study in gastric cancer and supports both the feasibility of tumor profiling and its clinical utility.

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Lee, J., Kim, S. T., Kim, K., Lee, H., Kozarewa, I., Mortimer, P. G. S., … Kang, W. K. (2019). Tumor genomic profiling guides patients with metastatic gastric cancer to targeted treatment: The viktory umbrella trial. Cancer Discovery, 9(10), 1388–1405. https://doi.org/10.1158/2159-8290.CD-19-0442

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