Skip to main content

Home-based prescribed exercise improves balance-related activities in people with Parkinson's disease and has benefits similar to centre-based exercise: a systematic review

12Citations
Citations of this article
101Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

This artice is free to access.

Abstract

Questions: In people with Parkinson's disease, does home-based prescribed exercise improve balance-related activities and quality of life compared with no intervention? Are the effects of home-based exercise similar to those of equivalent centre-based exercise? Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials. Participants: Adults diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Intervention: Predominantly home-based prescribed exercise (defined as a minimum of two-thirds of the exercise being completed at home). The intervention had to primarily involve physical practice of exercises targeting gait and/or standing balance compared with either control (ie, usual care only, a sham intervention or no physiotherapy) or equivalent predominantly centre-based exercise. Outcome measures: The primary outcome was balance-related activities and the secondary outcomes were gait speed, Berg Balance Scale, Functional Reach test, and quality of life. Results: Sixteen trials met the inclusion criteria and all contributed to the meta-analyses. Twelve trials compared home-based prescribed exercise with control, and four trials compared home-based prescribed exercise with equivalent centre-based exercise. Home-based prescribed exercise improved balance-related activities (SMD 0.21, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.32) and gait speed (SMD 0.30, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.49), but not quality of life (SMD 0.11, 95% CI −0.01 to 0.23) compared with control. Home-based and centre-based exercise had similar effects on balance-related activities (SMD −0.04, 95% CI −0.36 to 0.27) and quality of life (SMD −0.08, 95% CI −0.41 to 0.24). Conclusion: Home-based prescribed exercise improves balance-related activities and gait speed in people with Parkinson's disease, and these improvements are similar to improvements with equivalent centre-based exercise. Registration: PROSPERO CRD 42018107331.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Flynn, A., Allen, N. E., Dennis, S., Canning, C. G., & Preston, E. (2019). Home-based prescribed exercise improves balance-related activities in people with Parkinson’s disease and has benefits similar to centre-based exercise: a systematic review. Journal of Physiotherapy, 65(4), 189–199. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jphys.2019.08.003

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free