“Beginning with the Smallest Intake”: Children's Brain Development and the Role of Neuroscience in Global Environmental Health

2Citations
Citations of this article
28Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Early exposure to environmental toxins like lead, air pollution, and arsenic can have long-lasting and irreversible consequences for children's neurodevelopment, especially in the developing world. Though the number of pollutants increases each year, some neuroscientists are forging partnerships to improve measurement, raise awareness, and promote global health. Early exposure to environmental toxins like lead, air pollution, and arsenic can have long-lasting and irreversible consequences for children's neurodevelopment, especially in the developing world. Though the number of pollutants increases each year, some neuroscientists are forging partnerships to improve measurement, raise awareness, and promote global health.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Sripada, K. (2017, September 13). “Beginning with the Smallest Intake”: Children’s Brain Development and the Role of Neuroscience in Global Environmental Health. Neuron. Cell Press. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2017.08.009

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free