Biologically active and antimicrobial peptides from plants

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Abstract

Bioactive peptides are part of an innate response elicited by most living forms. In plants, they are produced ubiquitously in roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves, highlighting their physiological importance. While most of the bioactive peptides produced in plants possess microbicide properties, there is evidence that they are also involved in cellular signaling. Structurally, there is an overall similarity when comparing them with those derived from animal or insect sources. The biological action of bioactive peptides initiates with the binding to the target membrane followed in most cases by membrane permeabilization and rupture. Here we present an overview of what is currently known about bioactive peptides from plants, focusing on their antimicrobial activity and their role in the plant signaling network and offering perspectives on their potential application.

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Salas, C. E., Badillo-Corona, J. A., Ramírez-Sotelo, G., & Oliver-Salvador, C. (2015). Biologically active and antimicrobial peptides from plants. BioMed Research International, 2015. https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/102129

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