Biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the amphibious weed ipomoea and their application in pollution control

21Citations
Citations of this article
32Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Use of aqueous extracts of leaves, stems, and roots of the pernicious aquatic weed ipomoea (Ipomoea carnea) drawn from different locations was explored in the biomimetic extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles (SNPs). It was found that despite the natural variability in the chemical content of ipomoea growing in different locations, certain extract-metal stoichiometries can be identified which give strikingly reproducible results in terms of the size and the shape of the SNPs. This is one of the first reports of its type in which possible role of natural variability in the chemical composition of a given botanical species on nanoparticle synthesis involving that species has been assessed. The use of the SNPs was explored in the degradation of typical organic pollutants-the dyes Alizarin Red S and Remazol Brilliant Blue R. The SNPs were found to speed up the dye degradation. © 2014.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Ganaie, S. U., Abbasi, T., Anuradha, J., & Abbasi, S. A. (2014). Biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the amphibious weed ipomoea and their application in pollution control. Journal of King Saud University - Science, 26(3), 222–229. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jksus.2014.02.004

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free