Why the brain knows more than we do: Non-conscious representations and their role in the construction of conscious experience

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Abstract

Scientific studies have shown that non-conscious stimuli and representations influence information processing during conscious experience. In the light of such evidence, questions about potential functional links between non-conscious brain representations and conscious experience arise. This article discusses neural model capable of explaining how statistical learning mechanisms in dedicated resonant circuits could generate specific temporal activity traces of non-conscious representations in the brain. How reentrant signaling, top-down matching, and statistical coincidence of such activity traces may lead to the progressive consolidation of temporal patterns that constitute the neural signatures of conscious experience in networks extending across large distances beyond functionally specialized brain regions is then explained. © 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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Dresp-Langley, B. (2012). Why the brain knows more than we do: Non-conscious representations and their role in the construction of conscious experience. Brain Sciences. MDPI AG. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci2010001

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