Breath-holding test in evaluation of peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity in healthy subjects

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Abstract

The aim of the study was to determine the feasibility of using a breath-holding test in assessing the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex compared with the single-breath carbon dioxide test. The study involved 48 healthy volunteers between the ages of 18–29 years. The breath-holding test was performed followed by the single-breath carbon dioxide test on the next day. A month after the first tests, these tests were repeated to evaluate their reproducibility The coefficient of variability in the single-breath carbon dioxide test ranged from 0 to 32% with a mean of 10 ± 7%. The mean coefficient of variability of the breath-holding test was 6 ± 4% (0–19%). A significant inverse correlation between the results of the two tests was noted following analysis (r = −0.82, p < 0.05). Conclusion A breath-holding test after deep inspiration reflects the sensitivity of the peripheral chemoreflex as defined by the single-breath carbon dioxide test in healthy subjects.

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APA

Trembach, N., & Zabolotskikh, I. (2017). Breath-holding test in evaluation of peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity in healthy subjects. Respiratory Physiology and Neurobiology, 235, 79–82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resp.2016.10.005

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