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CYP2C19 genotype, physician prescribing pattern, and risk for long QT on serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors

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Abstract

Aim: To examine the impact of CYP2C19 genotype on selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) prescribing patterns. Patients methods: Observational cohort containing 507 unique individuals receiving an SSRI prescription with CYP2C19 genotype already in their electronic medical record. Genotype was distributed as follows: n = 360 (71%) had no loss of function alleles, 136 (26.8%) had one loss of function allele and 11 (2.2%) had two loss of function alleles. Results conclusion: For poor metabolizers exposed to sertraline, citalopram or escitalopram, providers changed prescribing patterns in response to alerts in the electronic medical record by either changing the drug, changing the dose or monitoring serial EKGs longitudinally. For intermediate metabolizers exposed to sertraline, citalopram or escitalopram, no alert was needed (mean QTc = 440.338 ms [SD = 31.1273] for CYP2C19∗1/∗1, mean QTc = 440.371 ms [SD = 29.2706] for CYP2C19∗1/∗2; p = 0.995).

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APA

Petry, N., Lupu, R., Gohar, A., Larson, E. A., Peterson, C., Williams, V., … Hines, L. J. (2019). CYP2C19 genotype, physician prescribing pattern, and risk for long QT on serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors. Pharmacogenomics, 20(5), 343–351. https://doi.org/10.2217/pgs-2018-0156

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