Effect of Chronic Aspirin Ingestion on Epithelial Proliferation in Rat Fundus, Antrum, and Duodenum

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Abstract

We studied the effect of chronic aspirin ingestion on gastroduodenal epithelial proliferaton by feeding rats aspirin in the drinking water. A control group of rats received plain water. At the end of 4 wk, [3H]-thymidine was given intravenously to label proliferating cells, and the rats were killed 1 h later. Sections of fundus, antrum, and proximal duodenum were processed for light autoradiography. We found that chronic aspirin ingestion stimulated epithelial proliferation in fundic mucosa but had no effect in the antrum. In the duodenum, aspirin increased proliferation in the lowest four crypt-cell positions, which most likely indicates an increase in stem-cell production. None of the tissues contained evidence of inflammation or ulceration. The proliferative effects of aspirin may help explain the previously observed phenomenon of mucosal adaptation in the rat after repeated exposure to aspirin. Further, if human gastroduodenal epithelium responds in a similar manner to chroriic aspirin exposure, the effects on proliferation may explain in part the distribution of aspirin-associated ulcers. © 1982, American Gastroenterological Association. All rights reserved.

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Eastwood, G. L., & Quimby, G. F. (1982). Effect of Chronic Aspirin Ingestion on Epithelial Proliferation in Rat Fundus, Antrum, and Duodenum. Gastroenterology, 82(5), 852–856. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0016-5085(82)80245-X

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