Can television help to decrease stigmatization among young children? The role of Theory of Mind and general and explicit inserts

5Citations
Citations of this article
23Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

Past research has considered how exposure to certain media content affects children’s Theory of Mind (ToM). It is possible, however, that ToM also moderates the effects of exposure to televised narratives on children’s behavior. Previous work found that special inserts, designed to help children understand an inclusion message, were somewhat effective in promoting children’s comprehension of the moral lesson. Such inserts, however, may be most effective in promoting inclusion among children lowest in ToM, who would theoretically be least likely to engage in prosocial behaviors. To test this possibility, we use data collected from four- to six-year-old children in the Netherlands (N = 66). We randomly assigned children to one of three conditions: a control, a treatment condition with general information inserts, and a treatment condition with explicit moral lesson inserts. Results indicate that children’s prosocial intentions mediate the relationship between condition and stigmatization, but only among children in the explicit condition lowest in ToM. This suggests that explicit inserts can help children low in ToM to learn from inclusion narratives. Comprehension of the moral lesson did not mediate this relationship. We integrate these findings with existing research, discussing overall conclusions in the context of child development.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Cingel, D. P., Sumter, S. R., Stoeten, E., & Mann, S. (2020). Can television help to decrease stigmatization among young children? The role of Theory of Mind and general and explicit inserts. Media Psychology, 23(3), 342–364. https://doi.org/10.1080/15213269.2019.1601570

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free