Candidate-gene approach in posttraumatic stress disorder after urban violence: Association analysis of the genes encoding serotonin transporter, dopamine transporter, and BDNF

  • N.L.M. V
  • H. V
  • Q. C
  • et al.
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Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder marked by behavioral and physiologic alterations which commonly follows a chronic course. Exposure to a traumatic event constitutes a necessary, but not sufficient, factor. There is evidence from twin studies supporting a significant genetic predisposition to PTSD. However, the precise genetic loci still remain unclear. The objective of the present study was to identify, in a case-control study, whether the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) val66met polymorphism (rs6265), the dopamine transporter (DAT1) three prime untranslated region (3′UTR) variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), and the serotonin transporter (5-HTTPRL) short/long variants are associated with the development of PTSD in a group of victims of urban violence. All polymorphisms were genotyped in 65 PTSD patients as well as in 34 victims of violence without PTSD and in a community control group (n = 335). We did not find a statistical significant difference between the BDNF val66met and 5-HTTPRL polymorphism and the traumatic phenotype. However, a statistical association was found between DAT1 3′UTR VNTR nine repeats and PTSD (OR = 1.82; 95% CI, 1.20-2.76). This preliminary result confirms previous reports supporting a susceptibility role for allele 9 and PTSD. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

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N.L.M., V., H., V., Q., C., K., M., R.A., B., S.B., A., … Mello, M. F. (2011). Candidate-gene approach in posttraumatic stress disorder after urban violence: Association analysis of the genes encoding serotonin transporter, dopamine transporter, and BDNF. Journal of Molecular Neuroscience, 44(1), 59–67. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12031-011-9513-7

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