A CARD9 polymorphism is associated with decreased likelihood of persistent conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in intestinal failure

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Abstract

Recently, genetic associations have been described in intestinal transplants. Namely, Crohn's disease susceptibility gene NOD2 polymorphisms have been reported to be more prevalent in patients with graft failure following intestinal transplantation (IT). Therefore, we sought to determine if polymorphisms in the NOD2 signaling cascade, including NOD2, CARD9, RAC1 and ATG16L1 are associated with intestinal failure (IF) or its complications. We carried out a cross-sectional study of 59 children with IF and 500 healthy Caucasian controls. Using the Taqman platform we determined the prevalence of NOD2 as well as ATG16L1, RAC1 and CARD9 SNPs. NOD2 pathway polymorphisms were evaluated in relation to outcomes of episodes of sepsis, ICU admissions, hyperbilirubinemia and need for IT. We found that the minor allele of a CARD9 SNP was associated with protection from developing IF when compared to healthy controls and was also associated with decreased odds of sustained conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Therefore, IF patients with CARD9 polymorphism are less likely to develop progressive liver disease and suggests that host innate immunity may play a role in IF associated liver disease.

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Burghardt, K. M., Avinashi, V., Kosar, C., Xu, W., Wales, P. W., Avitzur, Y., & Muise, A. (2014). A CARD9 polymorphism is associated with decreased likelihood of persistent conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in intestinal failure. PLoS ONE, 9(1). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0085915

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