CD146 Deletion in the Nervous System Impairs Appetite, Locomotor Activity and Spatial Learning in Mice

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Abstract

Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are crucial effectors for the development and maintenance of the nervous system. Mutations in human CAM genes are linked to brain disorders and psychological diseases, and CAM knockout mice always exhibit similar behavioral abnormalities. CD146 is a CAM of the immunoglobulin superfamily that interacts with Neurite Outgrowth Factor and involved in neurite extension in vitro. However, little is known about its in vivo function in the nervous system. In this study, we used a murine CD146 nervous system knockout (CD146(ns-ko)) model. We found that the brains of some CD146(ns-ko) mice were malformed with small olfactory bulbs. CD146(ns-ko) mice exhibited lower body weights and smaller food intake when compared with wild type littermates. Importantly, behavior tests revealed that CD146(ns-ko) mice exhibited significant decreased locomotor activity and impaired capacity for spatial learning and memory. Our results demonstrate that CD146 is important for mammalian nervous system development and proper behavior patterns.

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Tu, T., Gao, Q., Luo, Y., Chen, J., Lu, D., Feng, J., … Yan, X. (2013). CD146 Deletion in the Nervous System Impairs Appetite, Locomotor Activity and Spatial Learning in Mice. PLoS ONE, 8(9). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0074124

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