CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers

62Citations
Citations of this article
106Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

This paper presents the simulation of the condensation of water vapour in the presence of non-condensable gas using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for turbulent flows in a vertical cylindrical condenser tube. The simulation accounts for the turbulent flow of the gas mixture, the condenser wall and the turbulent flow of the coolant in the annular channel with no assumptions of constant wall temperature or heat flux. The condensate film is assumed to occupy a negligible volume and its effect on the condensation of the water vapour has been taken into account by imposing a set of boundary conditions. A new strategy is used to overcome the limitation of the currently available commercial CFD package to solve the simultaneous simulation of flows involving multispecies and fluids of gas and liquid in separate channels. The results from the CFD simulations are compared with the experimental results from the literature for the condensation of water vapour with air as the non-condensable gas and for inlet mass fraction of the water vapour from 0.66 to 0.98. The CFD simulation results in general agree well with the directly measured quantities and it is found that the variation of heat flux in the condenser tube is more complex than a simple polynomial curve fit. The CFD results also show that, at least for flows involving high water vapour content, the axial velocity of the gas mixture at the interface between the gas mixture and the condensate film is in general not small and cannot be neglected. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Li, J. D. (2013). CFD simulation of water vapour condensation in the presence of non-condensable gas in vertical cylindrical condensers. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 57(2), 708–721. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2012.10.051

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free