How is childhood development of immunity to Plasmodium falciparum enhanced by certain antimalarial interventions?

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Abstract

The development of acquired protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum infection in young African children is considered in the context of three current strategies for malaria prevention: insecticide-impregnated bed nets or curtains, anti-sporozoite vaccines and intermittent preventive therapy. Evidence is presented that each of these measures may permit attenuated P. falciparum blood-stage infections, which do not cause clinical malaria but can act as an effective blood-stage "vaccine". It is proposed that the extended serum half-life, and rarely considered liver-stage prophylaxis provided by the anti-folate combination sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine frequently lead to such attenuated infections in high transmission areas, and thus contribute to the sustained protection from malaria observed among children receiving the combination as intermittent preventative therapy or for parasite clearance in vaccine trials. © 2007 Sutherland et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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Sutherland, C. J., Drakeley, C. J., & Schellenberg, D. (2007). How is childhood development of immunity to Plasmodium falciparum enhanced by certain antimalarial interventions? Malaria Journal. https://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-6-161

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