Chromated copper arsenate–treated wood: a potential source of arsenic exposure and toxicity in dermatology

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Abstract

Arsenic-contaminated drinking water presents a serious health hazard in certain geographic locations around the world. Chromated copper arsenate, a pesticide and preservative that was used to pressure treat residential lumber in the United States beginning in the 1940s and was banned by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, poses a potential source of arsenic exposure and toxicity. In this study, we review the clinical manifestations of arsenic intoxication with the focus on dermatologic manifestations. Dermatologists should be aware that although chromated copper arsenate-treated wood for residential use was banned in 2003, the exposure risk remains. Long-term follow up is necessary to detect arsenic induced cutaneous and visceral malignancy in patients with history of arsenic exposure.

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APA

Chen, A. Y. Y., & Olsen, T. (2016, March 1). Chromated copper arsenate–treated wood: a potential source of arsenic exposure and toxicity in dermatology. International Journal of Women’s Dermatology. Elsevier Inc. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijwd.2016.01.002

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