Clinical and lesion morphologic determinants of coronary angioplasty success and complications: Current experience

157Citations
Citations of this article
13Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objectives.: This study evaluated the validity of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association ABC lesion classification scheme and its modifications. Background.: With the continued refinement in angioplasty technique and equipment evolution, the lesion morphologic determinants of immediate angioplasty outcome have changed significantly. Hence, the validity of the classification scheme has been questioned. Methods.: We assessed the lesion morphologic determinants of immediate angioplasty outcome in 729 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angioplasty of 994 vessels and 1,248 lesions. Results.: Angioplasty success was achieved in 91% of lesions, and abrupt closure occurred in 3%. Success was achieved in 96%, 93% and 80% of type A, B and C lesions, respectively (A vs. B, p = NS; B vs. C, p < 0.001; A vs. C, p < 0.001; A vs. B1, p = NS; A vs. B2, p = 0.03; B1 vs. B2, p = 0.02; B2 vs. C, p < 0.001; C1 vs. C2, p = NS). Abrupt closure occurred in 2.1%, 2.6% and 5% of type A, B and C lesions, respectively (A vs. B, B vs. C, A vs. C and A vs. B1, all p = NS; B1 vs. B2, p = 0.01; B2 vs. C1, p = NS; C1 vs. C2, p = 0.04). Type B characteristics had a success rate ranging from 74% to 95% and an abrupt closure rate ranging from 2.2% to 14%. Type C characteristics had a success rate ranging from 57% to 88% and an abrupt closure rate ranging from 0% to 16%. Longer lesions, calcified lesions, diameter stenosis of 80% to 99% and presence of thrombus were predictive of a lower success rate. Longer lesions, angulated lesions, diameter stenosis of 80% to 99% and calcified lesions were predictive of an abrupt closure. Conclusions.: The previously proposed classification schemes are outdated and need to be changed for application in current angioplasty practice. Analyzing specific lesion morphologic characteristics rather than applying a simple lesion classification score when evaluating angioplasty outcome may be more useful because it provides a more precise profile of the lesion and allows better patient stratification and selection. © 1995 American College of Cardiology.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Tan, K., Sulke, N., Taub, N., & Sowton, E. (1995). Clinical and lesion morphologic determinants of coronary angioplasty success and complications: Current experience. Journal of the American College of Cardiology, 25(4), 855–865. https://doi.org/10.1016/0735-1097(94)00462-Y

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free