Comparative study on skin temperature response to menstruation at acupuncture points in healthy volunteers and primary dysmenorrhea patients

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess skin temperature response to menstruation at acupuncture points in primary dysmenorrhea (PD) patients and healthy volunteers so as to explore acupuncture point specificity in reflecting diseases in the light of skin temperature. METHODS: Fifty-two PD patients and 49 healthy volunteers were recruited. Skin temperature measurements were performed with a skin temperature assessment device at 10 points. Absolute difference between skin temperature of the same point on the left and right side is used as main outcome measure. RESULTS: On the first day of menstruation, when menstrual pain attacking in PD patients, a significant increase in skin temperature difference was detected at Taixi (KI 3) compared with the healthy group (P < 0.01). A significant reduction in skin temperature difference was detected at Taixi (KI 3) in the first day of menstruation compared with those values in the third day after menstruation (P < 0.01) in the healthy group. On the third day after menstruation, a significant reduction in skin temperature difference was found at Zhongdu (LR 6) in PD group compared with the healthy group (P < 0.05). No significant differences of skin temperature were detected at other points (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: The skin temperature difference at menstruation-relevant points in PD patients did not all change significantly more than those in women without PD. Significant difference was only found in Taixi (KI 3), the Yuan-source point of Kidney meridian.

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She, Y., Ma, L., Zhu, J., Qi, C., Wang, Y., Tang, L., … Song, J. (2017). Comparative study on skin temperature response to menstruation at acupuncture points in healthy volunteers and primary dysmenorrhea patients. Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine = Chung i Tsa Chih Ying Wen Pan, 37(2), 220–228. https://doi.org/10.1016/s0254-6272(17)30048-1

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