The comparison of effect of video-modeling and verbal instruction on the performance in throwing the discus and hammer

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Abstract

Aim: This study was designed to examine the efficacy of video instruction relative to that of verbal instruction on learning and performance in hammer and discus throwing in track and field exercise. Video instruction was defined as a practice session in which the coach was aided by the use of video. Verbal instruction was defined as practicing with the coach providing verbal feedback. Method: Participants were 30 untrained student, whose mean age was 19 yr. (SD = .3). The participants were randomly assigned into two groups given. At first, participant's throwed discus and hammer (pretest). The same practice method for 10 practice sessions but different types of modeling. Some participants observed a videotape of an expert model performing the skills, and the second group observed a verbal instruction by coach of track-field. At the end of 10 practice sessions, participant's throwed discus and hammer again (pretest). Results: On the post-test, the two instruction groups led to significantly increase in distance of hammer and discus throwing. But, the video instruction groups performed better than the verbal group. In the other hand, the finding of independent T test indicated that the range of improvement in throwing of two skills were significantly higher in video group than verbal instruction grouped. Conclusion: Our study provides evidence supporting an increased role of Educational technology or instructional technology on learning in exercise technical skills in athletes particularly amateur athletes. © 2009.

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APA

Maryam, C., yaghoob, M., Darush, N., & Mojtaba, I. (2009). The comparison of effect of video-modeling and verbal instruction on the performance in throwing the discus and hammer. Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1(1), 2782–2785. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2009.01.493

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