Compromised cerebral blood flow reactivity is a predictor of stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid artery occlusive disease

198Citations
Citations of this article
24Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the hemodynamic consequences of extracranial carotid disease correlate with the risk of subsequent cerebral infarction. Methods: In 95 patients with symptoms who had greater than or equal to 70% stenosis (31 patients) or who had occlusion (64 patients) of the ipsilateral carotid artery, cerebral blood flow was measured by the stable xenon/computed tomography technique both at baseline and after vasodilatory challenge with intravenous acetazolamide. Patients were stratified into group 1, 43 patients with no more than a 5% decrease in flow in any vascular territory, and group 2, 52 patients with greater than a 5% decrease in one or more vascular territories after an acetazolamide challenge. Results: In group 2, 15 (28.9%) of 52 patients had a new stroke, but only one (2.3%) of 43 patients in group 1 did (p = 0.0005). Of patients with total carotid occlusion 10 (26%) of 38 in group 2 and none (0%) of 26 in group 1 had a new stroke (p = 0.003). Of patients with greater than or equal to 70% stenosis, five (36%) of 14 in group 2 and only one (6%) of 17 in group 1 had a stroke (p = 0.067). Conclusion: The loss of cerebral reactivity in patients with symptoms who had greater than or equal to 70% carotid stenosis or occlusion is an important predictor of impending cerebral infarction. (J VASC SURG 1995;21:338-45.). © 1995 Society for Vascular Surgery and International Society for Cardiovascular Surgery, North American Chapter.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Webster, M. W., Makaroun, M. S., Steed, D. L., Smith, H. A., Johnson, D. W., & Yonas, H. (1995). Compromised cerebral blood flow reactivity is a predictor of stroke in patients with symptomatic carotid artery occlusive disease. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 21(2), 338–345. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(95)70274-1

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free