Conditioned taste aversion induced by motion is prevented by selective vagotomy in the rat

17Citations
Citations of this article
8Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

The role of the vagus nerve in motion-induced conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was studied in hooded rats. Animals with complete, selective gastric vagotomy failed to form conditioned taste aversion after multiple conditioning sessions in which the conditioned stimulus (a cider vinegar solution) was drunk immediately before a 30-min exposure to vertical axis rotation at 150°/s. Results are discussed with reference to the use of CTA as a measure of motion-induced "sickness" or gastrointestinal disturbance, and, because motion-induced CTA requires that both the vagus nerve and the vestibular apparatus be intact, in light of the possible convergence of vagal and vestibular functions. © 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Fox, R. A., & McKenna, S. (1988). Conditioned taste aversion induced by motion is prevented by selective vagotomy in the rat. Behavioral and Neural Biology, 50(3), 275–284. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0163-1047(88)90954-5

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free