Cycle-triggered cortical stimulation during slow wave sleep facilitates learning a bmi task: A case report in a non-human primate

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Abstract

Slow wave sleep (SWS) has been identified as the sleep stage involved in consolidating newly acquired information. A growing body of evidence has shown that delta (1–4 Hz) oscillatory activity, the characteristic electroencephalographic signature of SWS, is involved in coordinating interaction between the hippocampus and the neocortex and is thought to take a role in stabilizing memory traces related to a novel task. This case report describes a new protocol that uses neuroprosthetics training of a non-human primate to evaluate the effects of surface cortical electrical stimulation triggered from SWS cycles. The results suggest that stimulation phase-locked to SWS oscillatory activity promoted learning of the neuroprosthetic task. This protocol could be used to elucidate mechanisms of synaptic plasticity underlying off-line learning during sleep and offers new insights into the role of brain oscillations in information processing and memory consolidation.

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Rembado, I., Zanos, S., & Fetz, E. E. (2017). Cycle-triggered cortical stimulation during slow wave sleep facilitates learning a bmi task: A case report in a non-human primate. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 11. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbeh.2017.00059

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