From the self to the social regulation of emotion: An evolving psychological and neural model

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Abstract

Imagine that you have just moved across the country to take a job as a professor at a new and exciting university. Beyond all the usual pragmatic hassles, like organizing the move, finding a place to live, and so on, perhaps the biggest challenges you will face are social and emotional. How you adaptively respond to these challenges will go a long way toward determining the ease of your transition, success in this new job, and your overall well-being. For example, you must meet and get to know all your new colleagues and their relationships to one another, including their relative differences in disposition, status, and friendship. At your new place of residence, you will meet new neighbors and come to understand their connections to one another. At your children’s school, you will meet many new parents and children and will come to know the complex web of relationships that ties them all together. And while doing all of this, you must—of course—be working to keep your research program going, mentoring your students, preparing to teach new classes, and establishing your new lab.

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APA

Ochsner, K. N. (2019). From the self to the social regulation of emotion: An evolving psychological and neural model. In Nebraska Symposium on Motivation (Vol. 66, pp. 43–75). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-27473-3_3

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