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Where are we, when are we, and who are we to each other? Connectedness and the evolving meanings of international education

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Abstract

Focusing on a new branch campus in South Korea of an American university, this paper examines connectedness and social identity for students who are already international by virtue of their secondary education abroad, as they return “home” for higher education. Such already international students are part of a relatively invisible population, excluded from aggregate calculations of “international students.” Drawing on a decade’s work on student diversity at the main US campus, a year at the Korea campus, and a range of written accounts from students in both campuses, this research considers their identity and connectedness from the perspective of a basic set of coordinates: which “where” are we, which “who” are you (or me or us), and how will that matter for our interaction?.

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Rosenblum, K. E., Haines, D. W., & Cho, H. (2017). Where are we, when are we, and who are we to each other? Connectedness and the evolving meanings of international education. In Cultural Studies and Transdisciplinarity in Education (Vol. 6, pp. 169–183). Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-981-10-2601-0_10

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