Niche partitioning among two Ceratitis rosa morphotypes and other Ceratitis pest species (Diptera, tephritidae) along an altitudinal transect in Central Tanzania

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Abstract

Two standard parapheromones, trimedlure (routinely used for monitoring Ceratitis rosa and C. capitata) and terpinyl acetate (routinely used for monitoring C. cosyra) were compared with enriched ginger root oil (EGO) lure for detecting and monitoring the presence and relative population abundance of these particular pest species. Standard yellow fruit fly traps were used for the comparison, which was conducted at 10 sites along an altitudinal transect ranging from 540 to 1650 masl on the Uluguru mountains, in Morogoro Region (Central Tanzania). A gradual change of relative occurrence of the two C. rosa morphotypes was clear from the EGO lure trapping. The morphotype R1 was predominant at lower altitudes while morphotype R2 was predominant at higher altitudes. Further experiments are needed to confirm the consistency of the observed pattern across regions, seasons and years as well as possible differences in the developmental physiology of both morphotypes. The mango fruit fly, Ceratitis cosyra, showed a distinct predominance at altitudes below 800 masl as shown in both the EGO lure and the terpinyl acetate trapping. The catches of all three target species were higher in traps with the EGO lure compared to the conventional lures trimedlure and terpinyl acetate. It is argued that for these species EGO lure can act as a suitable and more effective alternative for trimedlure and terpinyl acetate parapheromones. In addition, EGO lure has the added advantage that it combines the taxon spectrum for the two latter substances, thus requiring the use of only a single attractant.

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Mwatawala, M., Virgilio, M., Joseph, J., & De Meyer, M. (2015). Niche partitioning among two Ceratitis rosa morphotypes and other Ceratitis pest species (Diptera, tephritidae) along an altitudinal transect in Central Tanzania. ZooKeys, 2015(540), 429–442. https://doi.org/10.3897/zookeys.540.6016

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