Novel understandings of host cell mechanisms involved in chronic lung infection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrotic lung

0Citations
Citations of this article
17Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

As one of the most debilitating and underdiagnosed hereditary conditions across the globe, cystic fibrosis requires intensive support from the healthcare system – particularly due to the increased susceptibility to chronic infection and resulting respiratory failure which can rapidly lead to death. In turn, the prevalence and action of a certain strain of bacterium – Pseudomonas aeruginosa – has gained a great deal of interest. Life-threatening chronic infections by P. aeruginosa have been shown to involve biofilm formation, proliferation and the release of quorum-sensing signaling molecules. Understanding the mechanism cascade by which this strain attacks cells within the respiratory epithelium, most notably airway epithelial cells, could offer insight into the pathway and components, which are attractive targets for therapeutic interventions.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Johnson, P. A. (2019). Novel understandings of host cell mechanisms involved in chronic lung infection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the cystic fibrotic lung. Journal of Infection and Public Health, 12(2), 242–246. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jiph.2018.10.014

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free