Psychology of Computer Use: VII. Measuring Technostress: Computer-Related Stress

  • Hudiburg R
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Abstract

The Computer Technology Hassles Scale was developed to measure technostress or computer-related stress. The Computer Technology Hassles Scale was based on the idea that certain interactions with computer technology are perceived by people to be stressful or a "hassle." Subjects rated a list of 65 "hassles" as to severity, uslng a graded response. To ascertain the relation of the Computer Technology Flassles Scale to other measures, the subjects were given the Perceived Stress Scale, a measure of global stress. Subjeccs were also given a measure of com- puter attitudes, the Computer Attitude Scale. Demographic data on each subject were also collected. The correlational analyses showed that scores on the Computer Technology Hassles Scale were significantly correlated with scores on the Perceived Stress Scale and the number of hours of computer use but not with attitudes toward computers. These results suggest that the Computer Technology Ilassles Scale taps a dimension of psychological stress and that increased computer use for some people leads to increased computer-relared stress

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APA

Hudiburg, R. A. (1989). Psychology of Computer Use: VII. Measuring Technostress: Computer-Related Stress. Psychological Reports, 64(3), 767–772. https://doi.org/10.2466/pr0.1989.64.3.767

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