Data on correlations between T cell subset frequencies and length of partial remission in type 1 diabetes

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Abstract

Partial remission in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is a period of good glucose control that can last from several weeks to over a year. The clinical significance of the remission period is that patients might be more responsive to immunotherapy if treated within this period. This article provides clinical data that indicates the level of glucose control and insulin-secreting β-cell function of each patient in the study at baseline (within 3 months of diagnosis), and at 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months post-baseline. The relative frequency of immune cell subsets in the PBMC of each patient and the association between the frequency of immune cell subsets measured and length of remission is also shown. These data support the findings reported in the accompanying publication, “A pilot study showing associations between frequency of CD4+ memory cell subsets at diagnosis and duration of partial remission in type 1 diabetes” (Moya et al., 2016) [1], where a full interpretation, including biological relevance of the study can be found.

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Narsale, A., Moya, R., Robertson, H. K., & Davies, J. D. (2016). Data on correlations between T cell subset frequencies and length of partial remission in type 1 diabetes. Data in Brief, 8, 1348–1351. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dib.2016.07.059

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