Stitching Women’s Lives: Interpreting the Artifacts of Sewing and Needlework

  • Beaudry M
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Abstract

In our introduction to this book, James Symonds and I characterized interpretive historical archaeology as a multifaceted congeries of contextual, politically and socially engaged approaches to the study of human lives and experiences. American historical archaeologists have employed variants of interpretive archaeology in their work since, at the very least, the 1970s (see, e.g., Ascher and Fairbanks, 1971; Deetz, 1977; Leone, 1977), although, apart from the noteworthy exceptions by Ascher and Fairbanks, Deetz, and Leone cited above, interpretive historical archaeologies failed to gain prominence in the field until after postprocessual archaeology (Hodder, 1991) and postcolonial theory (Trigger, 2005:444–478; Wilkie, 2009:337) gained firm traction as alternatives to the long-entrenched canon of processualism (Beaudry, 1996, 2007). (PDF) Stitching Women’s Lives: Interpreting the Artifacts of Sewing and Needlework. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/227056284_Stitching_Women's_Lives_Interpreting_the_Artifacts_of_Sewing_and_Needlework [accessed Nov 21 2018].

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Beaudry, M. C. (2011). Stitching Women’s Lives: Interpreting the Artifacts of Sewing and Needlework (pp. 143–158). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-70759-4_7

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