Defining subsets of naive and memory B cells based on the ability of their progeny to somatically mutate in vitro

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Abstract

The increased affinity of memory antibody responses is due largely to the generation and selection of memory B cells that accumulate somatic mutations after initial antigenic stimulation. Further affinity maturation and mutation also accompany subsequent immunizations. Previous studies have suggested that, like primary antibody-forming cell (AFC) clones, secondary AFC do not accumulate further mutations and, therefore, the origins of progressive affinity maturation remain controversial. Here, we report the generation of somatically mutated memory B cell clones in vitro. Our findings confirm the existence of a naive B cell subset whose progeny, rather than generating AFC, somatically mutate and respond to subsequent antigenic stimulation. Interestingly, upon stimulation, a subset of memory B cells also generates antigenresponsive cells that accumulate further somatic mutations. © 1995 Cell Press.

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Decker, D. J., Linton, P. J., Zaharevitz, S., Biery, M., Gingeras, T. R., & Klinman, N. R. (1995). Defining subsets of naive and memory B cells based on the ability of their progeny to somatically mutate in vitro. Immunity, 2(2), 195–203. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1074-7613(95)80092-1

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