Detection of Non-Permitted Food Colors in Edibles

  • Kaur Purba M
  • Sudhir K Shukla N
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Abstract

Background: Food colors are used to give an attractive appearance to food articles. Food colors are categorized as permitted and non-permitted colors. Use of non-permitted food colors has led to loss of real quality of food. Adulteration of food products is a cause of concern these days. Objective: The objective was to detect the presence of non-permitted food colors in edibles using preliminary color test and thin layer chromatography. Materials and methods: Four types of samples i.e. turmeric, jelly, green peas and namkeen were collected from different locations for analysis. 20 samples of each were collected from different locations to be analysed for adulteration with most commonly used food colors i.e metanil yellow and malachite green. Non permitted food colors in collected edibles were detected using preliminary color test and thin layer chromatography. Results: The colour change and Rf values of the test samples were analysed and it was observed that 46% of food products tested were adulterated with metanil yellow whereas adulteration with malachite green was about 44% of the tested samples. Conclusion: The used methods of detection can be used in the area of food quality control to detect such harmful and banned colors in edibles without massive instrumentation.

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Kaur Purba, M., & Sudhir K Shukla, N. A. (2015). Detection of Non-Permitted Food Colors in Edibles. Journal of Forensic Research, s4. https://doi.org/10.4172/2157-7145.1000s4-003

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